The Bulletin of the U. S. Army Medical Department, 1944. Alexander Fleming on the discovery of penicillin. World War II.

The Bulletin of the U. S. Army Medical Department, 1944. Alexander Fleming on the discovery of penicillin.

Washington DC: War Department, Office of the Surgeon General, June 1944. Pamphlet. Thanks to Margaret Hutchinson Rousseau, the first American woman to earn a doctorate in chemical engineering, her development of deep tank fermentation and the design of the first production plant for large scale production of penicillin saved thousands of lives in the second world war. In July of 1943 the War Production Board drew up a plan for the mass distribution of penicillin stocks to Allied troops fighting in Europe; by June of 1945, over 646 billion units per year were being produced, saving an estimated 12 to 15% of Allied lives.

This is a monthly bulletin (June 1944) issued to acquaint medical personnel of the Medical Department informed on developments in war medicine, including penicillin. Page 1 with list titled "Indications and Contraindications for the use of penicillin" prepared by Dr. Chester Keefer. Also includes a 12pp article titled "The Discovery of Penicillin" by Alexander Fleming, in which Fleming writes, "I have been asked to say how I came to discover penicillin. ... I was always on the lookout for new bacterial inhibitors, and when I noticed on a culture plate that the staphylococcal colonies in the neighbourhood of a mould had faded away I was sufficiently interested in the antibacterial substance produced by the mould to pursue the subject" (p55).

Other topics include: tuberculosis, patients evacuated by aircraft, adaptability in time of war, care of surgical instruments, food in Japan, annual report on hospitals, venereal disease, etc. 8vo, 122pp, staple bound. Tan paper wrappers, front & rear wrapper detached & bit chipped at edges. Very good overall. Item #21707

Price: $125.00

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