Address to the Citizens of the United States of America on the Subject of Slavery, from the Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends, (Called Quakers) Held in New-York. Samuel Parsons.

Address to the Citizens of the United States of America on the Subject of Slavery, from the Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends, (Called Quakers) Held in New-York.

New York: New York Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends, 1837. Wraps. Pamphlet with text of anti-slavery address made at the yearly meeting of Quakers in Flushing New York, which ran one of the first underground railroads in the country.

In the 1830s the abolitionist movement in New York was just gathering steam: there were race riots in 1834 in which St. Philip's Episcopal Church (known as a prominent abolitionist meeting place) was burned down; in 1835 New York's Anti-Slavery Society was officially chartered, and the first Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women was held in New York on May 9, 1837. At the Women's convention, 175 women from 10 states representing 20 female antislavery groups gathered to discuss their role in the abolition movement.

This pamphlet closes with the following text: "For the meeting held in New York in adjournments, from the 29th of the 5th month, to the 2d of the 6th Month, inclusive, 1837. Samuel Parsons, Clerk." The Parsons family were especially active in the underground railroad. Samuel Bowne Parsons, a member of Flushing Meeting, is described in his obituary as hiding runaway slaves.

16mo, 11pp (4 1/2 x 7 1/4"). Printed paper wrappers. Upper corner front wrapper missing, with no loss to text. A bit of scattered foxing, penciled lines of verse on rear wrapper. String bound. Sabin no. 81781. OCLC: 3752518. Good + overall. Item #22766

Price: $125.00

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