Item #27347 Benedict Arnold discussed in the British Parliament; The Connecticut Courant and Weekly Intelligencer, 1782. Benedict Arnold.
Benedict Arnold discussed in the British Parliament; The Connecticut Courant and Weekly Intelligencer, 1782.
Benedict Arnold discussed in the British Parliament; The Connecticut Courant and Weekly Intelligencer, 1782.
Benedict Arnold discussed in the British Parliament; The Connecticut Courant and Weekly Intelligencer, 1782.

Benedict Arnold discussed in the British Parliament; The Connecticut Courant and Weekly Intelligencer, 1782.

Hartford: Hudson and Goodwin, 25 June 1782. Newspaper. An article copied from a London newspaper account describing the House of Commons discussion on February 19th to add a clause to the mutiny bill reflecting on Gen. Benedict Arnold.

The clause proposed by Mr. Burke was quite inflammatory, regarding 'Shamefully flying before the enemy or shamefully surrendering up a post, were crimes punishable with death..." in the King's Dominions, except in Great-Britain, and the islands of Jersey, Guernsey, Sark and Man..."

Burke clearly did not want Arnold in charge of British forces in America. "Mr. Burke called upon the new Secretary of state to inform the house, who was to command the army in America; and how the war in that country was to be carried on? He took occasion to mention Gen. Arnold; but while he paid the tribute due the gallantry and spirit of that officer, he condemned administration for having given him a military employment and place him, who had betrayed his trust in one instance, at the head of a part of the British army; which measure might tend to depress the sentiments of true honor in the breast of our officers." Other members responded similarly, suggesting that he should be paid but not given military honors. Mr. Burke continued that "he was a brave and gallant officer; but that the breach of his trust at West Point was not the bright part of his character." It is rather rich that these British parliamentarians spoke disapproving of Arnold's character as a betrayer, even as it had the potential to turn the tide of the Revolutionary War in their favor.

Arnold was an American army officer of repute during the Revolutionary War up until 1779, when as commander of West Point, he began secret negotiations to turn over the fort to the British. In 1780 Arnold's contact Major André was captured and later hung. Arnold escaped to England, received a British army commission, and lived the remainder of his life there.

A second article mentioned Arnold, and how 'Mrs. Arnold, like the Queen, dresses with great taste, yet with the most perfect neatness.'

The main article is printed on the front page of the Connecticut Courant and Weekly Intelligencer, No. 909, for 25 June 1782.

9.5 x 14", 4pp, original fold, slt discoloration, with some loss of lettering at the center fold. 18.5 column inches. Very good overall. Item #27347

Price: $325.00

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